Self Story no. 4

I stood alone in the large green field as all of the boys grouped up together for the game we were about to play, as per the instructions we were just given. As I look around I notice that every single one of my peers had a group except for myself, and that all of them were staring right at me.
“Okay guys Jessica still needs a group, who’s going to take her?” only silence followed. Our cub scout leader named ‘wolf’ just sighed and pointed for a group for me to be forced into, but the ten year old boys were not having it.
“No way!” “Not fair” “We don’t want her! She’s a girl!” They all screamed as I held back tears.

I was fairly used to this by now, it was my third week of boy scouts and the first two weeks had been in no way easier than tonight. I had decided to join because I did not overly care for girl guides, all of my friends were boys and I didn’t really like typical ‘girl activities’. So my mom thought that I would like boy scouts and I could just join the same meetings as my brother.

The leader standing on the side by a large tree calls me over to come talk to him while the rest of the kids started the game, and no longer able to control myself I walk up to him wiping tears off my face as I stare at my feet. He begins to explain to me that the rest of the cubs just aren’t used to seeing a girl here and that they will warm up to me. But I can’t help but to get more upset, even at ten years old I knew that how I was being treated was not okay. I told him about how they would refuse to talk to me, and how they told me to leave them alone. Of all of the times they told me I could not possibly do what they were doing because ‘ I was a girl’ and I should go braid hair and go back to girl guides.
Unsure of what to tell me, my leader just asks me to take a deep breath and that the boys would accept me eventually.

One thought on “Self Story no. 4

  1. What a very insightful story. This quote “Of all of the times they told me I could not possibly do what they were doing because ‘ I was a girl’ and I should go braid hair and go back to girl guides” really highlights the appalling sexism, that you experienced. Did your brother ever try to defend you in anyway? Although, the story lacked some artifacts and metaphors, I could still empathize with your situation based on the information. I liked how you did not just say, “so depressing” or, ” I felt sad”, but focused on the sexism and negative ideas; this helped demonize the sexism and sexist fragility, which convey your emotions to the audience implicitly. I think in a way, both of our stories are similar. As we both noticed single gendered groups and social conditioning.

    The ‘Normative Narrative’ that I noticed: females who dislike some stereotypical female activities, and have lots of male friends, must be Tomboys who prefer masculine activities, because of this quote “I had decided to join because I did not overly care for girl guides, all of my friends were boys and I didn’t really like typical ‘girl activities’” and this quote “So my mom thought that I would like boy scouts and I could just join the same meetings as my brother”. Just because someone dislikes some gender stereotypical activities, does not mean they prefer all of the opposite gender stereotypical activities. For example, I disliked Skateboarding as a kid, but loved reading.

    I would focus on artifacts and metaphors because they can help engage your audience. Very little was described about the location and characters.

    Like

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